Her.Stories: Women filmmakers in Abu Dhabi, Fact sheet on women in the U.S. film industry, Ava DuVernay, Little Miss Jihad and more

Women Filmmakers Perfect Roles in Abu Dhabi
at Gulf News

Women’s Leadership Fact Sheet: A Project of Women Leaders Count
“Women in the U.S. Film Industry” (Fall 2012 Report by the Institute for Women’s Leadership at Rutgers University and the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media)
Download the PDF report

Digital Hollywood Women highlight ‘What Women Want’
at Examiner.com

Ava DuVernay: A New Director, After Changing Course
Listen/read/watch at NPR

Seven Islands International Film Festival in Chennai; focuses on women in 2012*
at India Education Diary
*Good news!  My friend Stephanie Law’s short film, Little Miss Jihad (previously featured as a HF.Spotlight), has been invited to screen at Seven Islands! Congrats, Steph!

AWFJ To Present Special Awards To Women Directors At Cinema St. Louis SLIFF 2012
at We Are Movie Geeks

Women still a minority in film, figures show (in Canada)
at the CBC

Rehovot film festival to focus on women and religion
at Haaretz

‘Mrs. Judo’ Featured in U.N. Association Film Festival
at The Rafu Shimpo

Who will follow Rama Burshtein to the Oscars?
at Haaretz

Naples International Film Festival to host “Women Calling the Shots” panel on November 3
at the NIFF

The UK Jewish Film Festival: The Women To Watch Out For
at Female First

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MAMACHAS DEL RING: Interview with filmmaker Betty M Park

BIOGRAPHY

BETTY M PARK is a Korean American filmmaker based in Brooklyn, New York, and makes her debut as a feature film director with Mamachas del Ring. She works as a producer and editor in TV, and her work as an editor includes the documentary The Innocence Project, which screened at the 2003 Hamptons International Film Festival.

Betty was born and raised in New York, and graduated from the University of California, Berkeley, with a double major in English and Philosophy. In addition to making films and TV, she continues to encourage others to resist the urge to punctuate her name.

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Her Film:  You work as a television producer and editor, with Mamachas del Ring being your directorial debut.  How did you draw from your producing and editing experience to inform this film?

Betty M Park: Being in the daily grind of telling stories for TV is definitely a kind of bootcamp for storytelling, and while I can’t point to specific links between that work and Mamachas del Ring, I’m sure it has helped develop my craft.

Photo courtesy of Noah Friedman-Rudovsky

HF:  Inevitably, filmmakers learn something about themselves in the process of making a film.  What have you taken away from your experience making this film and what did you learn from the women whose lives you documented?

BMP: One of the things that struck me the most is how similar Carmen Rosa’s experience as a struggling wrestler is to that of an independent filmmaker, or anyone who has an all-consuming passion for that matter. There are distinct choices we make in terms of prioritizing our personal lives versus our work, and these are the choices that in part define us and make us who we are.

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“The film landscape is constantly evolving, and there will always be an infinite number of ways to approach it.”

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HF:  There is a strong theme of self-empowerment in Mamachas del Ring while also showing the cholitas’ reality of “gendered responsibilities” as you say on your website.  What do you think the legacy of the cholitas will be?  

BMP: My hope is that the cholita wrestling revolution has forever challenged and changed the stereotype of Bolivian indigenous women for both Bolivians and those abroad. I also think that, due to media-interest even outside of this specific documentary, cholita wrestling has provided an entertaining and interesting entry-point into a country and culture relatively unknown to your average person.

Photo courtesy of the filmmaker

HF:  Mamachas has screened around the world in front of culturally diverse audiences from Buenos Aires to Montreal, Austria to Uruguay and many places in between.  Do you notice differences in how audiences interpret the story or their attitudes toward the film’s themes?

 

BMP: While I think each audience comes with a different background of information, I’m not sure I could speak to region-specific reactions. 

Generally speaking, I think what initially attracts people to Mamachas is the opportunity to peer into what appears to be a strange and exotic universe of women wrestling in indigenous clothing, but what they take away is a more personal connection with Carmen Rosa and her struggles. 

HF:  Did you have a film festival strategy and if so, how did you decide on where you wanted it to premiere and screen?

 

BMP: The general rule of thumb for me (and for most people, I think) was to try to premiere at a festival that was well-known enough to provide the opportunity to generate some press and “buzz,” in addition to having a strong market where there would be buyers and industry folks in attendance. The regional premieres that followed were also guided by a similar principle. 

I had always thought that Mamachas would have an audience outside of the US, and so for me international festivals were as important as the domestic ones. It was also extremely important to me to have a strong Latin American premiere, since this is a film about Latin America.

HF:  How have you utilized social media and new/online media for Mamachas?

 

BMP: Facebook and twitter have been invaluable in connecting with both fans of Mamachas, potential fans of Mamachas, and the film community. I reached out to a lot of pro-wrestling fans online, and diva-dirt.com was especially supportive. The site focuses specifically on female wrestling fans, and they were extremely generous in helping to promote the Indiepix DVD and VOD release of Mamachas earlier this summer.


Photo courtesy of the filmmaker

HF:  Can you describe your marketing and distribution plan for this film?

BMP: The marketing and distribution for this film relied heavily on connecting with folks in the film community through festivals and general word of mouth. There were a few identifiable audiences that I tried to reach out to, including fans of wrestling, fans of Latin American film/Latin American audiences, and the more general arthouse film crowd. Of course distribution comes down to having the right platform through which people can access the film, and right now it is available in its most democratic form–DVD and VOD.

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“There are distinct choices we make …that in part define us and make us who we are.”

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HF:  Are there any lessons or skills — technical, financial, creative — that you picked up along your journey making this film that you will apply to future projects?

BMP: One of the most valuable experiences I’ve had in this process is connecting with other filmmakers, many of whom have grappled with similar hurdles in the ups and downs of indie filmmaking, some of whom who have become dear friends. The film landscape is constantly evolving, and there will always be an infinite number of ways to approach it. To have a few trustworthy sounding boards within the community is priceless to me, and will be especially helpful moving forward with future projects.

Photo courtesy of Noah Friedman-Rudovsky

HF:  What’s next on your slate of projects?

BMP: I’m currently working on an animation, and exploring a few documentary ideas.

To connect with Betty M Park and learn more about her work, check out the following:

No Sleep ’til Fruition: Interview with 18-year old filmmaker MJ Slide

Read MJ Slide’s biography and her first Her Film interview (“Staying True to Yourself”) from September 2010 here.

Her Film: It’s been about a year since your first interview with Her Film when you discussed your film, The Saving, and you took it to the Seattle True Independent Film Festival this June.  Can you talk a bit about your expectations you had for the film and what’s been happening with it?

MJ Slide: The release and reception The Saving has received has far exceeded my expectations. It’s been screened in dozens of the theaters across the US and in the UK. As awesome as getting into festivals is (5 to date for this film) more importantly for myself as a Writer/Director would be the fact that individuals have really connected to the film’s message and passed on the word that this upstart 18-year old filmmaker is serious about making films and making them with quality generally not associated with my age.

Filmmaker MJ Slide at the premiere of her first film, The Saving, in South Carolina. (Photo courtesy of the filmmaker)

HF:  What are the most important lessons you’ve learned in making your first film and navigating the festivals?

MJS: Do your research and if you can, snag a personal contact with someone within the festival structure even before submitting to it. It will go really far once you’re ready to submit. There’s nothing wrong with having an “in.” Be personal and go the extra mile to convince the fest your film is one their festival NEEDS. Also Watch Paul Osborne’s Official Rejection, a documentary on the politics of film fests, and go ahead and buy Chris Gore’s Ultimate Film Festival Survival Guide. Both are invaluable resources to any independent filmmakers prepping to take on the fest circuit.

“Give back to your audience…because honestly, without them, your film is just that, a film…”

MJ Slide with STIFF student block director, Daniel Hoyos, at Seattle’s True Independent Film Festival (STIFF) 2011 in Seattle, Washington. (Photo courtesy of the filmmaker)
HF:  What tools or skills have you found to be the most effective for building an audience?

MJS:  First and foremost, (and it’s kinda sad how many people overlook this step), have a quality film.  Second, know your demographic, and third, be personable. People like to deal with real people; be genuine, know your stuff, and continue to build relationships with those who are in similar situations. Reach out and connect, it’s a two way street. Give back to your audience, treat them like royalty because honestly, without them, your film is just that, a film…that no one is watching. Cultivate your image both on and offline, and I can’t stress enough how important social media is. It’s one of a filmmaker’s strongest tools. It’s free but it is an investment. Your audience is waiting for you. All you have to be willing to do is put yourself out there in creative engaging ways.

Official development one-sheet for Fruition Hard Line. (Image courtesy of the filmmaker)

HF:  What are you working on now?

MJS:  Several different projects but garnering most of my attention is my very first feature film, an indie steampunk movie entitled Fruition Hard Line.

From the Fruition Hard Line screen test (Photo courtesy of the filmmaker)

 I’m both co-writing and producing. It’s a truly amazing project and the group of people we’ve already assembled in development is by far the strongest, most versatile, and talented set of individuals both myself and my director, Timi Brennan, have worked with in either of our careers. We’re working very hard to push the envelope and raise the bar on what people would consider possible for an independent film shot in what would be considered a less than ideal filmmaking climate.

From the Fruition Hard Line screen test (Photo courtesy of the filmmaker)

The story itself is about a young girl, haunted by immense psychic abilities, who becomes entangled in a bizarre underworld of machinery and magic. I can list on one hand the amount of properly made sci-fi fantasy indie films, and my sincere hope is that Fruition Hard Line will be able to join their ranks. It’s going to be a long haul but I most definitely think it would be worth you guys coming along for the ride. As we say at Magnolia Hideout Pictures, it’s all indie film world domination up in here 🙂

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To connect with MJ Slide and learn more about her work, check out the following:

Junk Ink Films

Fruition Hard Line (film)

The Saving (film)

@MJ_Slide on Twitter

Interview with Screen Stockport

“Kinks”: Guest interview by filmmakers Juliane Block & Virginia Kennedy

Juliane Block and Virginia Kennedy are the filmmaker duo who created Kinks, a feature mockumentary about two sisters who meet while shooting a kinky American reality show in Malaysia and fight because one is the Host and the other, the Censor.

Virginia & Juliane about Kinks:

How did you get to work together?

Juliane: When I finished my first feature Emperor I already thought about the next film. And there was one thing I haven’t tried out yet – Acting. I knew Virginia from some Indie film meetings in Kuala Lumpur and thought maybe it’s a great fit. I knew she was keen on directing her first feature, so I approached her. First, just with the idea of having collaborative writing sessions, but [to tell the] truth I already thought about asking her as director or co-director at an early stage.

Things progressed and Virginia came on board!

Virginia: The first time I saw Juliane she was selling a short film she had made and I was blown away by this opinionated German woman’s strength. She was fiery and powerful. I was too scared to even make contact with her. I hid in the back and made a silent escape. The second time I met her, a film distribution friend of mine thought I should meet this “female” director. It was Juliane! Up close and personal we actually had a lot in common and I realized I had as many if not more scary qualities like her. And honestly she is FAR from scary. She is strong and honest and all great qualities. I was so lucky to meet her. Julie said she had an idea for a feature film and I was looking to work with someone who made things happen. Juliane was that someone!

Betty's Elimination. (Photo courtesy of the filmmakers)

Working together to create Kinks:

Virginia: Firstly Juliane has an amazing work ethic. Working with her was perfect for me. She is driven to achieve, so our writing schedule was regular and geared to succeed. Within a year we had a full feature script. We found that we worked well together. Only arguing maybe three or four times… and those arguments were usually when I was on a diet or needing relationship advice! Juliane was a great couch therapist and within that year I wrote a script with her and healed a broken heart! Great achievement.

As the shoot day came nearer, I also realized Julie has an amazing producing ability. Her organization skills are better than a lot of the professionals I have worked with and we had to work around crews that were working for no budget.

Juliane: I think Virginia and I have a very good set of skills we were able to bring to Kinks. Virginia is great in writing and I have experience with low budget producing. Additionally we have both our own experiences about living as white women in Asia and all those experiences we could use to add into the story of Kinks. The finished film is really our collaborative product. I think both of us learned a lot!

Movie poster for "Kinks" (Image courtesy of the filmmakers)

What do you plan to do with Kinks?

 Juliane: We finished Kinks a couple of months ago and are currently looking for distribution. We are on the festival circuit, awaiting the replies of some of the big ones. However, knowing it’s always very tough to get even into the Tier 2 festivals, we are working on our blog and alternative social media strategies to make Kinks public. We want to release it around May 2012 on itunes and other internet outlets, and have time to build our audience till then. Of course a big festival premiere would help, so fingers crossed!

Virginia: Our plan for Kinks is to entertain and enlighten. Julie and I have both lived in Malaysia and we have a lot of respect for Malaysia and Malaysians. I personally love Malaysia. It is warm and sweet and caresses you like a buttery muffin. I love Malaysia but like all countries they have their “ways” and this can be cause for humor just as western culture can be made fun of.

Kinks celebrates all cultures. It looks at Malaysia which is different from my western upbringing and looks at it in a humorous way from the perspective of shooting a crazy reality program in Malaysia. We want everyone to appreciate Malaysia by seeing Kinks.

What did you learn so far?

 Juliane: I think the biggest thing I learned is that you need to put money aside for your distribution. I came along with a range of skills to actually kickstart production and to last with almost no budget until the film is finished. However, now we are realizing that distributing the feature film is an entirely different challenge, as difficult as creating the film itself. Well, once you realize that, it sounds logical, but when you are on it, you might just overlook some very important aspects – like the distribution 🙂 I recommend anybody who wants to make a film – double the production budget, keep 50% for distribution!

Virginia: I learnt how wonderful Malaysian actors are and how generous and willing they are to work hard. I learnt that you need to prepare even harder for distribution. Shooting is the easy part but getting it out there on a no budget production takes work and strategy. I learnt, with the help of Julie, how to create a strategy for selling an independent film. Without her I probably would have given away all rights to the film and it might have been left on the shelf. I also learnt that you have to LOVE your script from the beginning. It is a little like a marriage because you have to stay married to it for a long time.

Production of "Kinks" (Photo courtesy of the filmmakers)

SYNOPSIS OF Kinks

Kinks is a mockumentary style feature film. The movie takes a cynical but nevertheless humorous look at two inter-racial sisters who appear far from alike. Inside and outside. One is white and one is dark.

Split up as children, because their parents divorced, the film starts when they finally meet again after years growing up on separate continents. On meeting it is obvious their agendas are as different as their looks. The fiercely competitive, western educated Caucasian looking Jay wants international success for her cross cultural dating show. She returns to Malaysia to produce her dream, a reality show for the American market. To succeed she needs it to be as outrageous as possible. Jay’s Malaysian sister, Joythi, the Indian looking darker one, happens to work for Ministry of Culture. She is more introverted and has to learn to stand up to her sister while desperately trying to keep her job, while in charge to establish some decency in Jay’s misguided production.

Clashes are inevitable!

The story of this mockumentary feature evolves during the two weeks production of the dating show pilot. Through the seemingly different sisters, Jay and Joythi the audience will witness first hand all the bruised egos, crazy accusations and extreme cultural clashes and misconceptions between East and West but also the similarities of two sisters being eventually just humans.

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Short CV Juliane Block

My filmmaking career started in Germany as special FX make-up artist on an underground Zombie flick (“Mutation,” released on DVD in 1999) followed by producer & screenwriter credits on several other shorts (e.g. “Killerbus,” released on DVD in 2004). I got hooked. Even though I have a design masters from the university of art in Braunschweig, I continued with film making.

In 2005 I migrated to Asia to pursue Asian cinema. I directed and produced a no budget feature in 2008 (“Emperor”) which screened at the Asia Pacific festival of 1st Films in Singapore and won the feature category at the Portable Film Festival. Since 2007 I directed, wrote and produced 13 shorts which have been screened in film festivals around the world, and my 2nd feature (“Kinks”) just completed post. I participated in the Berlinale Talent Campus in 2008 and my short film “It could happen to you” was chosen for production in the BTC Hands on Training “Garage studio”. I’ve held lectures about low budget film making in Hong Kong (Hong Kong Int. Film Academy) and Singapore (SAE Institute).

After living the last 6 years in Asia (Hong Kong, Malaysia, Thailand & Indonesia) I just returned to Germany to pursue my next feature film projects.

I love my life!

Short CV Virginia Kennedy:

I started out working as a special effects editor and animator in commercials in Australia and South East Asia. Designing program openers and promos for CHANNEL 7 in Melbourne. I then moved to Sydney and into Advertising.

I was offered a job in Malaysia and was excited to travel so the first time I left Australia was to live overseas. Soon I moved into directing music videos and commercials in 1994. I have shot many commercials all around the globe and won Malaysia best MUSIC VIDEO (AIM) four times. In 2007 I shot a Music Video in LA for Karkis.

I moved into films with a Malaysian 60minute telemovie Jalan Berangan which I wrote and directed for the “Festival Series” on NTV7 and after a few short films, a horror, “@traction”, and a sexual revenge drama “I’ll Trust this January.” I wrote and directed Kinks with Juliane Block.

I have completed shooting a magic realism, short film “Thread” I wrote and directed and will be submitting to festivals in 2012. I am continuing writing with two completed feature film scripts.

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To find out more or to follow the film, watch a trailer of Kinks online here and connect with the film on twitter @kinksthemovie, on facebook at kinksthemovie or subscribe to the newsletter by signing up on the website.

Living an inspired life

If you’re anything like me, sometimes you need a real kick in the ass to get going and recognize the power you hold and the talent you possess.  Today, I’m inspired.  I’ve been reading a blog lately that really lights a fire under me to get up off my keister and get sh** done!  Just Add Cape: adventures in becoming a real life superhero (see blog roll on right), a blog by L.A.-based writer-director-producer-actress Kai Soremekun, is all about finding inspiration, becoming empowered and finding your voice.  Her web series CHICK is all about that, too.  It’s definitely a package deal you get with the blog and show, a full-on brand that focuses on empowerment.  Wow, we need that! (Do we ever! I hope you’ll say.)

I love Kai’s positive take on life, fears and dreams, not only on this blog, but also in her web series (about a woman who becomes a superhero).  Just Add Cape is much more than just a support or supplement to her series, it’s an incredibly nurturing space where people are called upon to be their best selves — superheroes, in fact!  THAT, yes, that, is something the world needs more than ever.  Check out Just Add Cape, and stay tuned for the second season of CHICK

Watch the video interview, “Feel the Fear and Do It Anyway,” with Kai Soremekun done for Her Film in 2010.

Stay tuned…

This blog has been on hiatus of late due to this author’s studying in Vancouver, Canada (go Canucks!) in a wildly intensive four-month entertainment administration program.  While it’s awesome to now understand how film distribution works, what a “nut” is (hint, it’s not a nut, and it’s often preceded by “house”), how to prepare a cash flow, understand a cost report, and what goes into prepping for a pitch, and then doing a story pitch to a panel of industry folk, needless to say it does not particularly help me when it comes to writing this blog!  But this blog is about to reboot and get crackin’ with more interesting stories from filmmakers.

Coming soon are a number of interviews with incredibly varied and multi-talented filmmakers — doc, short and feature filmmakers — who live and work in different areas of the world, all in keeping with part of the mission of Her Film to engage in discussions with women filmmakers and crew members from all over this blue and green globe.  Topics to be discussed include navigating film festivals, comedy, women in sports, women making movies about women, and much more.

Her Film is growing! 

Begun in collaboration with Marian Evans, author of the Wellywood Woman blog (of which Her Film is a sister blog),  writer/cultural activist and inspiring tweeter @devt, the Her Film blog is now growing into a global effort to build audiences for films that are by, for and about women.  We’ve joined google+ (if you’re not on Google+ yet and would like an invitation, please send an email request or simply find us on google+), and Marian, especially, is developing some fascinating and inspiring ways to engage with people across the world.  Stay tuned for more news on the expanding horizons of Her Film.

In the meantime, as you await new posts, here are a few links to blogs, articles and websites that have particularly inspired me of late and demonstrate some commendable development within the filmmaking industry worldwide:

African Women In Cinema Blog

Discusses topics affecting African women working in film.  Affiliated with the Center for the Study and Research of African Women in Cinema.

The Case for Global Film: Discussing everything that isn’t Hollywood (and a little that is).

Gender Across Borders: a global feminist blog

India’s Portrayal of Women in Media

Blog post on the Women’s Media Center website.

Older Than America (2008)

First feature film directed by a Native American woman (Georgia Lightning).

The Pink Gorilla (Tuesdays with Lucy)

Tribute to Lucille Ball by actor and her former student, Taylor Negron.

Women Film Critics Circle

Women’s Film History Network – UK/Ireland

Women Talk Sports: media coverage of female athletes

Zen Producer

Written by filmmaker Sheila Hardy, past guest blogger here on Her Film.

If you know of any new films by women filmmakers, blogs about independent film (especially films by, for or about women), or awesome women’s film festivals, please send me an email with a link and I’ll post the link here on Her Film.

Women’s Film Preservation Fund Celebrates Women Filmmakers

As The First Female Director Wins Oscar,  the Women’s Film Preservation Fund Steps Up its Work Preserving the Cultural Legacy of Women In Film

Three upcoming programs in November showcase the extraordinary range and talent of women in the industry.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 19, 2010 – The Women’s Film Preservation Fund, a division of New York Women in Film and Television, is the only project of its kind in the world working to preserve the cultural legacy of women in cinema by restoring and conserving their movies. This November, three programs in New York, of films preserved by WFPF, will showcase the wide-ranging talent almost lost to degrading celluloid.

Since its inception in 1996, the fund has provided grants to over 80 films both long and short form and of every genre, building a library of multi-genre narrative and documentaries. Films like the silent work of Alice Guy-Blaché and Barbara Kopple’s Academy Award-winning 1976 documentary HARLAN COUNTY USA have benefited from the restoration fund.

“Our goal is to increase the public’s knowledge of the innovative and pioneering contributions of women in cinema from the very inception of the form.” says co-chair Drake Stutesman “We see the importance of these films for audiences and scholars alike and are excited to share these rediscovered works in New York.”

The three programs will take place on November 1st, 7th and 21st at New York’s most prestigious cinema institutions. Showing November 1st at the Film Society of Lincoln Center is a fully restored print of WILL directed by the pioneering African American director Jessie Maple. Will (Obaka Adedunyo) is a former All-American basketball player trying to kick his drug habit. He and his wife take in and nurture a homeless boy called Little Brother. By practicing self-empowerment, mentoring the boy, and coaching a girl’s basketball team, Will is able to contain his addiction and regain his life. The first independent feature film to be directed by a black woman, WILL maintains a positive course while confronting struggle and tragedy. A New Yorker, Maples also pictures Harlem and its street life in the early eighties as part of a lively, complex neighborhood without the sensational violence or melodrama of contemporaneous Blaxploitation movies. WILL was a forerunner of the independent, minority filmmaking that would breed directors like Spike Lee and Lee Daniels. Following the screening Maple, who is now in her 80’s, will discuss her work and the changes in urban cinema. Tanya Hamilton, the writer/director whose most recent work is NIGHT CATCHES US, will join Maple on stage following the film.

On November 7th, in conjunction with Eighth Annual International Film Preservation Festival at MoMA, the Women’s Film Preservation Fund will present two unique programs of work: PRETTY WOMEN and BY HAND AND HEART. The nine feminist films presented in both programs focus on eroticism, class, crime, art and identity. Betty Tells Her Story, included in the Pretty Women program, became an iconic film in the documentary form. Dr. Stutesman will introduce both programs.

On November 21st at the Paley Center for Media, the Peabody and Emmy Award winning television film PLAYING FOR TIME will be screened in segments with special guests Vanessa Redgrave, Jane Alexander and producer Linda Yellen. The film, still considered a television landmark, tells the true story of Fania Fénelon and a group of women who attempted to escape death at Auschwitz by playing in an orchestra.

For more information please visit http://www.womensfilmpreservation.org

For screeners of select programs and press photos please contact:

Film First Co.

Jessica Edwards

jessica@filmfirstco.com

917-620-8529

 

Women’s Film Preservation Fund

Drake Stutesman

greenly@earthlink.net

212-677-8535

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Monday, November 1st, 2010 at 6.30pm

Screening: WILL (1981), Director: Jessie Maple

Location: Film Society of Lincoln Center – Walter Reade Theater

Discussion with Jessie Maple and reception following the film.

A true pioneer, Jessie Maple was the first African American woman to enter New York’s IATSE union and the first to produce a feature-length independent film. She founded 20 West, Home of Black Cinema in Harlem in 1982 as a showplace for independent black films. Maple’s work, in the genre of urban cinema, is a precursor to films such as Lee Daniel’s Precious (2009). Writer/director Tanya Hamilton will join Jessie for a panel following the film moderated by WFPF co-chair Drake Stutesman.

Sunday, November 7th, 2010 – 1pm and 3pm

Screening: Save & Project Series at MoMA

Location: MoMA Theater 3 (The Celeste Bartos Theater).

Program 1: Pretty Women Program 2: By Hand and Heart are screening in conjunction with the Eighth Annual International Film Preservation Festival at the Museum of Modern Art.

Introduced by Drake Stutesman, Co-Chair, The Women’s Film Preservation Fund

Program 1: Pretty Women (56min)

Lipstick 74. (1974) USA. Directed by Jane Morrison. Super 8mm film made by the late documentarian Jane Morrison that offers a glimpse into the private world of women and their toilet. Preserved by Northeast Historic Films. 8 min.

Anything You Want to Be. (1971) USA. Directed by Liane Brandon. In a series of vignettes, a teen age girl finds that despite her parents’ assurance that she can “be anything she wants to be”, reality sometimes provides another outcome. Preserved by Liane Brandon. 8 min.

Betty Tells Her Story. (1972) USA. Directed by Liane Brandon. In two continuous takes, a woman sitting in a chair in her apartment tells a story about the purchase of a dress from dual perspectives. Preserved by Liane Brandon. 20 min.

All Women Are Equal. (1972) USA. Directed by Marguerite Paris. This documentary short explores the life of Paula, a male to female transsexual. This film is a nonexploitative representation of an ordinary, well-adjusted transgendered person and one made before many other films on the subject. Preserved by MIX: New York Lesbian and Gay Experimental Film Festival. 15 min.

Desire Pie. (1976) USA. Directed by Lisa Crafts. A deceptively erotic animation short celebrating the joyfulness of lovemaking, all to a funky jazz score. Preserved by Lisa Craft. 5 min.

Additional Information: http://www.moma.org/visit/calendar/film_screenings/10617

Program 2: By Hand and Heart (92min)

Quilting Women. (1976) USA. Directed by Elizabeth Barret. A joyful celebration of women artists who quilt, combining folk tradition, sorority and individual creativity to transform an ordinary household item into a thing of unique beauty. Preserved by Appalshop. 28 min.

Las Madres: The Mothers of Plaza de Mayo. (1985) Argentina. Directed by Lourdes Portillo, Susana Muñoz. This Academy Award nominated film tells the story of a group of mothers who have all lost a child during Argentina’s “Dirty War” in the 1970’s. These women come together each week in the Plaza de Mayo near the President’s house and demand to lean the fate of their children. Preserved by Lourdes Portillo. 64 min.

Additional Information : http://www.moma.org/visit/calendar/film_screenings/10618

Sunday, November 21st, 2010 at 3:00pm

Screening: Playing for Time (1980), Producer: Linda Yellen, Director: Daniel Mann

Location: Paley Center For Media

Clips from the film will be shown with a panel discussion with Producer Linda Yellen and actors Vanessa Redgrave and Jane Alexander.

Playing for Time, a ground-breaking television special starring Vanessa Redgrave and Jane Alexander, dramatizes the heart wrenching story of Fania Fénelon and a group of women who hoped to escape death in Auschwitz by playing in an orchestra . Written by Arthur Miller, the film won numerous awards including an Emmy and a Peabody and was one of the few television film to be screened at Cannes.

Additional Information: http://www.paleycenter.org/2010-fall-a-look-back-at-playingfor-time/

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Thanks to Kia Muhammad at Film First Co. for this information and for permission to post it here on Her Film.